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Home > Catholic Encyclopedia > A > Agram

Agram

(Also ZAGRAB; Latin Zagrabia).

Archiepiscopal see of the ancient kingdom of Croatia, in Austria, founded towards the end of the eleventh century as a suffragan of Kalocsa in Hungary, and made an archdiocese in 1852. Its Latin Catholic population is 1,319,367; there are 1,877 Greek Catholics, 118,304 Greek Orthodox, 9,573 Protestants, and 11,929 Jews, besides a few Mohammedans. Agram has 348 parishes, served by 615 secular and 66 regular priests. The episcopal city (20,000) is pleasantly located in a broad plain, near the Save, and is surrounded to the north and west by vine-clad hills. The castle-like residence of the archbishop and the medieval Gothic cathedral, with its sacristy (itself a church), are remarkable monuments. There are three suffragan sees: Bosnia-Syrmia (with residence at Djakovar), Senj (Zengg, Segnia), and Krizevac (Koros, Kriz, Kreutz). The vernacular of the people is the Croatian tongue. Agram possesses a university for the southern Slavs, opened in 1874, owing chiefly to the endeavours and sacrifices of Bishop Strossmayer of Djakovar. There are also an archiepiscopal seminary and a college for boys, besides a Greek Catholic seminary and gymnasium. Among the ecclesiastical institutes of Agram is the "Piarum summarum praefectura", a fund of about one million dollars (1882), the interest of which is devoted to the support of establishment of charity and beneficence.

Sources

NEHR, in Kirchenlex., I, 347; BATTANDIER, Ann. Pont. Cath. (Paris, 1905), 306; WERNER, Orbis Terr. Cath. (Freiburg, 1890), 90; KERSELICH, His. Eccl. Zabrab (ibid., 1773); FARLATI Illyricum Sacrum, V, 330.

About this page

APA citation. Shahan, T. (1907). Agram. In The Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton Company. http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/01225b.htm

MLA citation. Shahan, Thomas. "Agram." The Catholic Encyclopedia. Vol. 1. New York: Robert Appleton Company, 1907. <http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/01225b.htm>.

Transcription. This article was transcribed for New Advent by Thomas M. Barrett. Dedicated to the people killed in Bosnia this decade.

Ecclesiastical approbation. Nihil Obstat. March 1, 1907. Remy Lafort, S.T.D., Censor. Imprimatur. +John Cardinal Farley, Archbishop of New York.

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