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Anthemius

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A Byzantine official of the fourth and fifth centuries, of high rank and fine character. He was one of the most celebrated magistrates of his day, noted for his wisdom and his administrative ability. St. Chrysostom and he entertained the greatest respect for each other. Anthemius was Magister Officiorum at the time of the disturbances which followed St. Chrysostom's deposition (Easter, 404), and the Saint's enemies demanded troops from him with which to disperse the crowd. At first he refused, but then yielded to their importunities, declaring that they were responsible for the consequences (Pallad. 83). Anthemius was made consul in 405, and soon after Prefect of the East (Cod. Theod. Chronol., 149), a position he held until 417. St. Chrysostom wrote to him in warm terms (Ep. cxlvii). The title of Patrician is given to him in the law of 28 April, 406 (Cod. Theod; Chron. 149). He was principal adviser to Theodosius the Younger (Socrates, Church History VII.1) and, through his daughter's marriage to Procopius, became grandfather to the Emperor Anthemius. He took part in the reception of the relics of the Prophet Samuel at Constantinople (Chron. Alex. 714; Theod. Lect. ii, 64; Tillemont, Empereurs).


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APA citation. A'Becket, J.J. (1907). Anthemius. In The Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton Company. http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/01553c.htm

MLA citation. A'Becket, John Joseph. "Anthemius." The Catholic Encyclopedia. Vol. 1. New York: Robert Appleton Company, 1907. <http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/01553c.htm>.

Transcription. This article was transcribed for New Advent by Nicolette Ormsbee.

Ecclesiastical approbation. Nihil Obstat. March 1, 1907. Remy Lafort, S.T.D., Censor. Imprimatur. +John Cardinal Farley, Archbishop of New York.

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