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Home > Catholic Encyclopedia > B > Bethlehem (as used in architecture)

Bethlehem (as used in architecture)

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An architectural term used in the Ethiopic Church for the oven or bakehouse for baking the Korban or Eucharistic bread. It is a usual attachment to Coptic churches and is generally situated somewhere within the enclosure of the church. It is shown in the plan of Mari Mina and the adjoining church of Mari Banai. The four walls of Dair Abu Makar enclose one principal and one or two smaller court-yards around which stand the cells of the monks, domestic buildings, such as the milkroom, the oven (Bethlehem), the refectory and the like.

Sources

BUTLER, The Ardent Coped Churches of Egypt, I, 48.

About this page

APA citation. Poole, T. (1907). Bethlehem (as used in architecture). In The Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton Company. http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/02534a.htm

MLA citation. Poole, Thomas. "Bethlehem (as used in architecture)." The Catholic Encyclopedia. Vol. 2. New York: Robert Appleton Company, 1907. <http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/02534a.htm>.

Transcription. This article was transcribed for New Advent by the Cloistered Dominican Nuns, Monastery of the Infant Jesus, Lufkin, Texas. Dedicated to the Holy Eucharist.

Ecclesiastical approbation. Nihil Obstat. 1907. Remy Lafort, S.T.D., Censor. Imprimatur. +John M. Farley, Archbishop of New York.

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