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Oristano

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Diocese of Oristano (Arborensis) in Sardinia.

Oristano was the capital of the giudicatura (independent district) of Arborea, given to the House of Sardi, after the expulsion of the Saracens, and was subject to Pisa. It was the last city to surrender to the Aragonese (1478), against whom it was valiantly defended by Mariano. Bishops of Arborea are mentioned for the first time in the letters of Gregory VII. The bishop Tragadorio (1195) built the cathedral; Friar Guido Cattano (1312) took part in the Franciscan controversy on the poverty of Jesus Christ; Jacopo Serra (1492) was Vicar of Rome and became a cardinal; Girolamo Barberani (1565) had several disputes with the Dominicans and Pius V; Antonio Canopolo (1588) founded the seminary, rebuilt by Luigi Emanuele del Carretto (1756), and contributed also to other works of public utility. In 1503 there was united to the See of Oristano that of Santa Giusta, where SS. Justa, Justina, and Ænedina martyred under Hadrian (?), are venerated. Bishops of Santa Ciusta are known from the year 1119. The diocese is a suffragan of Cagliari; it has 74 parishes, with 97,000 inhabitants, 3 religious houses of men, and 7 of women, 3 schools for boys, and 2 for girls.


Sources

Cappelletti, Le Chiese d'Italia, V.

About this page

APA citation. Benigni, U. (1911). Oristano. In The Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton Company. http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/11316b.htm

MLA citation. Benigni, Umberto. "Oristano." The Catholic Encyclopedia. Vol. 11. New York: Robert Appleton Company, 1911. <http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/11316b.htm>.

Transcription. This article was transcribed for New Advent by William D. Neville.

Ecclesiastical approbation. Nihil Obstat. February 1, 1911. Remy Lafort, S.T.D., Censor. Imprimatur. +John Cardinal Farley, Archbishop of New York.

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