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Home > Catholic Encyclopedia > T > The Diocese of Telese

The Diocese of Telese

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(TELESINENSIS)

Telese, a small town in the Province of Benevento, Southern Italy, is situated in the valley of the Calore, well known for its hot sulfur springs. The ruins of the ancient Telesia, the Tedis of the Oscan coins, are to be seen yet on Monte Acerro. The city was captured by Hannibal in 207 B.C.; Scipio founded a colony there. Having fallen into decay it was rebuilt in the ninth century. Its first bishop mentioned in Agnellus (487); in the tenth century it was subject to the Archbishop of Benevento. In 1612 Bishop Gian Francesco Leoni (1508) transferred the episcopal residence to Cerreto Sannita. In 181 the see was united to that of Piedimonte d'Alife, but was re-established in 1852. Among its bishops we may note: Alberico Giacquinto (1540), renowned for his learning and piety; Angelo Massarelli (1567), secretary of the Council of Trent, of which he wrote the acts and a diary; Vincenzo Lupoli (1792), a distinguished jurisconsult. The diocese contains 24 parishes with 60,600 inhabitants, 40 secular and 10 regular priests, 2 convents of men and 5 nunneries, and a school for young girls.


Sources

CAPPELLETTI, Le chiese d'Italia, XIX; PACELLI, Memorie storiche di Telese (1775).

About this page

APA citation. Benigni, U. (1912). The Diocese of Telese. In The Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton Company. http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/14476a.htm

MLA citation. Benigni, Umberto. "The Diocese of Telese." The Catholic Encyclopedia. Vol. 14. New York: Robert Appleton Company, 1912. <http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/14476a.htm>.

Transcription. This article was transcribed for New Advent by John D. Beetham.

Ecclesiastical approbation. Nihil Obstat. July 1, 1912. Remy Lafort, S.T.D., Censor. Imprimatur. +John Cardinal Farley, Archbishop of New York.

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