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Home > Catholic Encyclopedia > T > Triest-Capo d'Istria

Triest-Capo d'Istria

(TERGESTINA ET JUSTINOPOLITANA.)

Suffragan diocese of Görz-Gradiska; exists as a triple see since 1821, when Cittanova (Æmonia) and Capodistria (Ægida, Capris, Justinopolis) were united to Triest, and its present name was assigned to the see.

St. Frugifer, consecrated in 524, was the first Bishop of Triest; since then it exhibits a long line of eighty-seven bishops. Despite their high character and great abilities, however, these bishops only in rare instances attained to eminence, owing to the small size of their diocese, which was subject to Aquileia, and to the rivalry between Aquileia and Venice. Foremost among the bishops is Enea Silvio de' Piccolomini, later Pope Pius II. Petrus Bonomo, a secretary of Frederick IV and Maximilian I, became Bishop of Triest in 1502, and was known as pater concilii in the fifth Lateran Council (1512). Giovanni Bogarino, teacher of Archduke Charles of Styria, was bishop from 1591. Joseph II abolished the Diocese of Triest in 1788, transferring the see to Gradiska. His brother, Leopold II, divided Gradiska into the Dioceses of Gorz and Triest, re-establishing Triest in 1791 and appointing as its bishop, Sigismund Anton, Count of Hohenwart and tutor of his children. Other attempts were made to suppress the see, but the emperor decreed its preservation, and von Buset was appointed bishop. After his death (1803) the see remained vacant eighteen years, owing to the disorders caused by Napoleon. Emperor Franz finally appointed Leonardi as Bishop of Triest. At the Synod of Vienna in 1849, Bartholomew Legat was present; he defended, with considerable fervour, the views of the minority in the Vatican Council. In 1909 Bishop Franz X. Nagi was appointed coadjutor cum jure successionis to the ninety-year-old Cardinal Prince-Archbishop Anton Gruscha of Vienna. The see numbers 409,800 Catholics with 291 priests, 81 male religious and 174 nuns.

About this page

APA citation. Wolfsgrüber, C. (1912). Triest-Capo d'Istria. In The Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton Company. http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/15045a.htm

MLA citation. Wolfsgrüber, Cölestin. "Triest-Capo d'Istria." The Catholic Encyclopedia. Vol. 15. New York: Robert Appleton Company, 1912. <http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/15045a.htm>.

Transcription. This article was transcribed for New Advent by Scott Anthony Hibbs.

Ecclesiastical approbation. Nihil Obstat. October 1, 1912. Remy Lafort, S.T.D., Censor. Imprimatur. +John Cardinal Farley, Archbishop of New York.

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